Writing a second verse of the star-spangled

So as the rain poured down, a smaller storm flag that measured by feet flew in its place. It did not become the national anthem until more than a century after it was written. The national anthem has four verses. All four verses conclude with the same line:

Writing a second verse of the star-spangled

However, it would run into the same objection as the amendment to the Pledge of Allegiance.

10 Things You May Not Know About the War of 1812

She was very proud of his being a descendant of Francis Scott Key. The Tripolitan war lives on not only in the Marine hymn, but also in other songs.

writing a second verse of the star-spangled

In Georgetown, Maryland, a banquet honoring Stephen Decatur and the other heroes celebrated the victory with a song written by lawyer Francis Scott Key.

Key took the popular drinking song, "Anacreon in Heaven," which had been used for many patriotic songs of the day, and turned it into an anthem: When the warrior returns from the battle afar, To the home and the country he has nobly defended, Oh!

Warm be the welcome to gladden his ear, And loud be the joys that his perils are ended! In the full tide of song, let his fame roll along. To the feast-flowing board let us gratefully throng.

The Star Spangled Banner (all 4 verses)

Where mixt with the olive the laurel shall wave, And form a bright wreath for the brow of the brave. The next verse celebrates the "band of brothers" that braved the desert and ocean to secure the rights and "fair fame" of America.

The third verse continues the theme, more explicitly focused on the Tripolitan war: Then mixt with the olive the laurel shall wave, And form a bright wreath, for the brow of the brave.

He would rewrite this song about Tripoli, with its imagery of bombs and warfare, and the arresting image of the "star-spangled" flag, which here obscures the Muslim crescent.While the first verse of "The Star-Spangled Banner" is widely known by the American public, the last three verses are generally omitted in performances.

While the first verse of "The Star-Spangled Banner" is widely known by the American public, the last three verses are generally omitted in performances.

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The Star-Spangled Banner" is the national anthem of the United States. The lyrics come from "Defence of Fort M'Henry", [2] a poem written on September 14, , by the then year-old lawyer and amateur poet Francis Scott Key after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry by British ships of the Royal Navy in Baltimore Harbor during the .

While the Star-Spangled Banner is one of the more famous poems put to music, there are many others.

The Forgotten Verses

Other Poems Set to Music. It turns out many of our greatest poets inspired musicians and composers. Natalie Merchant set Emily Dickinson’s poem “Because I could not stop for Death” to music in Aug 29,  · Key originally wrote “The Star-Spangled Banner” as a patriotic poem first published in a Baltimore newspaper shortly after the event that inspired it.

“The Star-Spangled Banner,” Americans hazily remember, was written by Francis Scott Key about the Battle of Fort McHenry in Baltimore during the War of Jul 04,  · And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

Note the caps, ye FReeper atheists and evolutionists masquerading as patriots.

writing a second verse of the star-spangled
The Star-Spangled Banner - Wikipedia